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The AAPI Minor

Pass/No Pass Academic Year 2020-2021: Courses taken P/NP during Fall 2020, Winter 2021, and Spring 2021 can be counted toward an AAPI Studies minor.

Students with Junior or Senior standing in Academic Year 2020-2021 may petition to retroactively count up to 2 courses taken P/NP prior to Fall 2020 toward the AAPI Studies minor.

 

How to Declare a Minor in Asian American and Pacific Islander Studies

  1. Read the general university requirements for a minor
  2. Fill out the AAPI Minor Check List (Fillable PDF). Select the courses from our AAPI Course Offerings.
  3. Log in to the Major/Minor Tool and submit your minor declaration request.
  4. Once your minor is approved, you will receive a notification message via the VAC. Check your degree audit to confirm your declaration.
Contact the AAPI Program Coordinator through the Virtual Advising Center (VAC) if you have questions about your minor, degree audit or would like to petition a course toward the minor. For more information on petitions, please visit the FAQ tab on our website.

Minor Requirements

The Asian American and Pacific Islander Studies minor will consist of a total of seven courses (28 units), which will be chosen from a range of available courses in various departments and programs. One must be a lower-division Core Course (ETHN 20, HILD 7B, or LTEN 28), and five courses (20 of the 28 units) must be upper division. Students may use one of the language courses listed on the Course Offerings for the UD requirement (if it is a LD language course, it must be petitioned). View the drop down menus below for a list of approved AAPI courses. Please note that these courses may not be offered each quarter or every year, however a drop down menu of course offerings for the current academic year is available.

AAPI Courses

Anthropology

Course Name Description

ANTH 21
Race and Racisms (4)

Why does racism still matter? How is racism experienced in the United States and across the globe? With insights from the biology of human variation, archaeology, colonial history, and sociocultural anthropology, we examine how notions of race and ethnicity structure contemporary societies.

ANTH 23
Debating Multiculturalism: Race, Ethnicity, and Class in American Societies (4)

This course focuses on the debate about multiculturalism in American society. It examines the interaction of race, ethnicity, and class, historically and comparatively, and considers the problem of citizenship in relation to the growing polarization of multiple social identities.

ANTH 44
Gender, Sexuality, and New Media Fandom in the Korean Wave (4)

This course examines new media fandoms through the representation and reception of gender and sexuality in Korean media consumed around the world by highlighting how Korean images are differently interpreted by other national groups. Contrasting various understandings of masculinity, homosexuality, and transgenderism, we explore how the meanings attached to gender and sexuality are not fixed by the productive frame of Korean society, but cocreated and reimagined by international audiences.

ANTH 105
Climate Change, Race and Inequality (4)

This course introduces students to the ways in which climate change exacerbates environmental racism and inequality. We will consider the ways that structural violence and discriminatory policies create environmental inequalities where marginalized communities take on more of the risk and burdens of climate change. We will address community organizing and social justice efforts to combat the systems of power that unevenly distribute the burdens of climate change to marginalized communities. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

ANTH 108
Indigenous Peoples, Extractive Development, and Climate Change (4)

Across the world, indigenous peoples’ lands and livelihoods are increasingly vulnerable to extractive development projects such as mines, gas wells, dams, logging, and monoculture agriculture, all of which increase the impacts on climate change. This class addresses the ways indigenous communities use cultural and political resources to negotiate environmental, market, and political forces. Can protecting indigenous ways of life provide alternatives for global climate change? Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

ANBI 121
Special Topics: The Original Moonshot - Polynesian Voyaging

For more than a millennium, Polynesians have occupied the remotest islands in the Pacific Ocean. Polynesians can trace their roots to a group of epic voyagers who ventured out into the unknown in one of the greatest adventures in human history. Using a mix of biology, history, geography, anthropology, and the science of navigation, “the original moonshot” will explore the thrill of exploration and the drama of discovery in a vivid tour of one of the most captivating regions in the world. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

ANSC 117
Transgenderisms (cross-listed with CGS 117) (4)

This course contrasts mainstream Anglo-American conceptualizations of transgenderism with ethnographic accounts of the experiences and practices of gender expansive people of color (African, Native, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Latinx Americans) in the U.S. and abroad. It will question the idea of transgenderism as a crossing from one gender to another one, the distinction between gender identity and sexuality, and the analytic of intersectionality. Students will not receive credit for both CGS 117 and ANSC 117. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

ANSC 144
Immigrant and Refugee Health (4)

Examines physical and mental health sequalae of internal and transnational movement of individuals and populations due to warfare, political violence, natural disaster, religious persecution, poverty and struggle for economic survival, and social suffering of communities abandoned by migrants and refugees. May be coscheduled with ANTH 238. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Students may not receive credit for ANSC 144 and ANTH 238.

ANSC 180
Capitalism and Gender (cross-listed with CGS 120) (4)

Drawing insight from anti-colonial and queer of color critique, this course critically examines the demands capitalism makes on us to perform gender, and how that relates to processes of exploitation and racialization. We will explore alternatives and develop strategies for navigating jobs in this system. Students may receive credit for one of the following: CGS 120, CGS 180 and ANSC 180. CGS 120 is renumbered from CGS 180. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

ANSC 194
Language, Migration, Borders (4)

This course uses the study of language to unpack contemporary processes of human mobility across geopolitical borders. We will explore both the role of language in shaping movement and the politics of language that arise from and around these movements. Migrations to the United States will be a core theme, though we will also work to put them in comparative perspective. Ultimately, our aim will be to critically rethink all three of the title terms—language, migration, and borders—in tandem. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

Chinese Studies

Course Name Description

CHIN 10AN/BN/CN
First-Year Chinese - Nonnative Speakers (4)

CHIN 10AN: Introductory course of basic Chinese for students with no background in Chinese. First quarter of a one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese in communicative skills. Covers pronunciation, fundamentals of Chinese grammar, and vocabulary. Topics include greetings, family affairs, numbers, and daily exchanges. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 11 and CHIN 10AN.  Prerequisites: Department Approval.


CHIN 10BN: Continuation of basic Chinese for students with no background in Chinese. Second course of one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese communicative skills. Covers pronunciation, more elaborate grammar, and vocabulary. Focus on goal-oriented tasks: school life, shopping, and transportation. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 12 and CHIN 10BN. Prerequisites: CHIN 11, CHIN 10AN, or department stamp.


CHIN 10CN: Continuation course of basic Chinese for students with no background in Chinese. Third course of one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese communicative skills. Expansion on pronunciation and more elaborate Chinese grammar and increasing vocabulary. Topics include dining, direction, and social life. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 13 and CHIN 10CN. Prerequisites: CHIN 12, CHIN 10BN, or department stamp.

CHIN 10AM/BM/CM
First-Year Chinese - Mandarin Speakers (4)

CHIN 10AM: Introductory course of basic Chinese for students with background in Mandarin Chinese. First quarter of one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese in communicative skills. Covers pronunciation, fundamentals of Chinese grammar, and vocabulary. Topics include greetings, family affairs, numbers, and daily exchanges. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 11 and CHIN 10AM. Prerequisites: department approval.


CHIN 10BM: Continuation introduction of basic Chinese for students with background in Mandarin Chinese. Second course of one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese communicative skills. Covers pronunciation, more elaborate Chinese grammar, and expanded vocabulary. Focus on goal-oriented tasks such as school life, shopping, and transportation. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 12 and CHIN 10BM. Prerequisites: CHIN 11, CHIN 10AM, or department stamp.


CHIN 10CM: Further continuation course of basic Chinese for students with background in Mandarin Chinese. Third course of one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese communicative skills. Expansion on pronunciation and more elaborate Chinese grammar and increasing vocabulary. Topics include dining, direction, and social life. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 13 and CHIN 10CM. Prerequisites: CHIN 12, CHIN 10BM, or department stamp.

CHIN 10AD/BD/CD
First-Year Chinese - Dialect Speakers (4)

CHIN 10AD: Introductory course of basic Chinese for students with background in a dialect of Chinese. First quarter of one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese in communicative skills. Covers pronunciation, fundamentals of Chinese grammar, and vocabulary. Topics include greetings, family affairs, numbers, and daily exchanges. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 11 and CHIN 10AD. Prerequisites: department approval.


CHIN 10BD: Continuation introduction of basic Chinese for students with background in a dialect of Chinese. Second course of one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese communicative skills. Covers pronunciation, more elaborate Chinese grammar, and expanded vocabulary. Focus on goal-oriented tasks such as school life, shopping, and transportation. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 12 and CHIN 10BD. Prerequisites: CHIN 11, CHIN 10AM, or department stamp.


CHIN 10CD: Further continuation course of basic Chinese for students with background in a dialect of Chinese. Third course of one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese communicative skills. Expansion on pronunciation and more elaborate Chinese grammar and increasing vocabulary. Topics include dining, direction, and social life. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 13 and CHIN 10CD. Prerequisites: CHIN 12, CHIN 10BD, or department stamp.

CHIN 20AN/BN/CN
Second-Year Chinese - Nonnative Speakers (4)

CHIN 20AN: Second year of basic Chinese for students with no background. First course of second year of a one-year curriculum for Chinese in intermediate communicative skills. Covers sentence structure, idiomatic expression, development of listening, speaking, reading, and written competence in Chinese. Topics include sports, travel, and special events. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 21 and CHIN 20AN. Prerequisites: CHIN 13, CHIN 10CN, score of 3 on AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam, or department stamp.


CHIN 20BN: Continuation of basic Chinese for students with no background in Chinese. Second course of one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese communicative skills. Covers pronunciation, more elaborate grammar, and vocabulary. Focus on goal-oriented tasks: school life, shopping, and transportation. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 12 and CHIN 10BN. Prerequisites: CHIN 11, CHIN 10AN, or department stamp.


CHIN 20CN: Final course of second year Chinese for students with no background. Third course of a one-year curriculum for Chinese intermediate communicative skills. Expansion on pronunciation and more elaborate Chinese grammar and increasing vocabulary. Topics include food, physical actions, and culture. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 23 and CHIN 20CN. Prerequisites: CHIN 22, CHIN 20BN, score of 5 on AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam, or department stamp.

CHIN 20AM/BM/CM
Second-Year Chinese - Mandarin Speakers (4)

CHIN 20AM: Second year of basic Chinese for students with background in Mandarin. First course of second year of one-year curriculum for Chinese in intermediate communicative skills. Covers sentence structure and idiomatic expression, development of listening, speaking, reading, and written competence. Topics include sports, travel, and special events. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 21 and CHIN 20AM. Prerequisites: CHIN 13, CHIN 10CM, score of 3 on AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam, or department stamp.


CHIN 20BM: Continuation introduction of basic Chinese for students with background in Mandarin Chinese. Second course of one-year curriculum for entry-level Chinese communicative skills. Covers pronunciation, more elaborate Chinese grammar, and expanded vocabulary. Focus on goal-oriented tasks such as school life, shopping, and transportation. Students may not receive duplicate credit for CHIN 12 and CHIN 10BM. Prerequisites: CHIN 11, CHIN 10AM, or department stamp.


CHIN 20CM: Final course of second year Chinese for students with background in Mandarin. Third course of one-year curriculum for Chinese intermediate communicative skills. Expansion on pronunciation and Chinese grammar and increasing vocabulary. Topics include food, physical actions, and culture. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 23 and CHIN 20CM. Prerequisites: CHIN 22, CHIN 20BM, score of 5 on AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam, or department stamp.

CHIN 20AD/BD/CD
Second-Year Chinese - Dialect Speakers (4)

CHIN 20AD: Second year of basic Chinese for students with background in a dialect of Chinese. First course of second year of one-year curriculum for Chinese in intermediate communicative skills. Covers sentence structure and idiomatic expression, development of listening, speaking, reading, and written competence in Chinese. Topics include sports, travel, and special events. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 21 and CHIN 20AD. Prerequisites: CHIN 13, CHIN 10CD, score of 3 on AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam, or department stamp.


CHIN 20BD: Continuation of second year of basic Chinese for students with background in a dialect of Chinese. Second course of one-year curriculum for Chinese intermediate communicative skills. Covers sentence structure and idiomatic expressions, development of listening, speaking, reading, and written competence in Chinese. Topics focus on China, population, and other nationalities. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 22 and CHIN 20BD. Prerequisites: CHIN 21, CHIN 20AD, score of 4 on AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam, or department stamp.


CHIN 20CD: Final course of second year Chinese for students with background in a dialect of Chinese. Third course of one-year curriculum for Chinese intermediate communicative skills. Expansion on pronunciation and more elaborate Chinese grammar and increasing vocabulary. Topics include food, physical actions, and culture. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 23 and CHIN 20CD. Prerequisites: CHIN 22, CHIN 20BD, score of 5 on AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam, or department stamp.

CHIN 100AN/BN/CN
Third-Year Chinese - Nonnative Speakers (4)

CHIN 100AN: Intermediate course of Chinese for students with no background. First course of third year of one-year curriculum that focuses on listening, reading, and speaking. Emphasizing the development of advanced oral, written competence, and aural skills in Mandarin. Topics include education, literature, history of Chinese language and society. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 111 and CHIN 100AN. Prerequisites: CHIN 23, CHIN 20CN, or department stamp.


CHIN 100BN: Intermediate course of Chinese for students with no background. Second course of third year of Chinese that emphasizes the development of advanced oral, written competence and aural skills in Mandarin. Topics include various cultural aspects of the Chinese language, additional family issues and society. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 112 and CHIN 100BN. Prerequisites: CHIN 111, CHIN 100AN or department stamp.


CHIN 100CN: Intermediate course of Chinese for students with no background. Third course of third year of one-year curriculum in Chinese language acquisition. Continue to develop proficiency at intermediate level. Improves students’ Chinese language skills and knowledge of the culture with an emphasis of reading and writing. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 113 and CHIN 100CN. Prerequisites: CHIN 112, CHIN 100BN. or department stamp.

CHIN 100AM/BM/CM
Third-Year Chinese - Mandarin Speakers (4)

CHIN 100AM: Intermediate course of Chinese for students with background in Mandarin and other dialects. First course of third year of one-year curriculum that focuses on listening, reading, and speaking. Topics include education, literature, history of Chinese language and society. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 111 and CHIN 100AM. Prerequisites: CHIN 23, CHIN 20CM or CHIN 20CD, or department stamp.


CHIN 100BM: Intermediate course of Chinese for students with background in Mandarin and other dialects. Second course of third year of Chinese that emphasizes the development of advanced oral, written competence, and aural skills in Mandarin. Topics include cultural aspects of the Chinese language, additional family issues and society. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 112 and CHIN 100BM. Prerequisites: CHIN 111, CHIN 100AM, or department stamp.


CHIN 100CM: Intermediate course of Chinese for students with background in Mandarin and other dialects. Third course of third year of one-year curriculum in Chinese language acquisition. Continue to develop proficiency at intermediate level. Improves students’ Chinese language skills and knowledge of the culture with an emphasis of reading and writing. Topics include economic development in China. Students may not receive duplicate credit for both CHIN 113 and CHIN 100CM. Prerequisites: CHIN 112, CHIN 100BM, or department stamp.

Critical Gender Studies

Course Name Description

CGS 101
Gender and Globalization (4)

This course explores effects of globalization on transnational relations of gender and sexuality. Topics include the division of labor, politics of production and consumption, constructions of gender and sexuality within global grassroots movements, and the migration of people, capital, and culture. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

CGS 112
Sexuality and Nation (cross-listed with ETHN 127) (4)

This course explores the nexus of sex, race, ethnicity, gender, and nation and considers their influence on identity, sexuality, migration movement and borders, and other social, cultural, and political issues that these constructs affect. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

CGS 114
Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Class (cross-listed with ETHN 183) (4)

Gender is often neglected in studies of ethnic/racial politics. This course explores the relationship of race, ethnicity, class, and gender by examining the participation of working-class women of color in community politics and how they challenge mainstream political theory.

CGS 119
Asian American Film, Video, and New Media: The Politics of Pleasure (cross-listed with LTCS 119) (4)

The course explores the politics of pleasure in relation to the production, reception, and performance of Asian American identities in the mass media of film, video, and the internet. The course considers how the “deviant” sexuality of Asian Americans (e.g., hypersexual women and emasculated men) does more than uniformly harm and subjugate Asian American subjects. The texts explored alternate between those produced by majoritarian culture and the interventions made by Asian American filmmakers. Students may not receive credit for LTCS 119 and CGS 119.

CGS 120
Capitalism and Gender (cross-listed with ANSC 180) (4)

Drawing insight from anti-colonial and queer of color critique, this course critically examines the demands capitalism makes on us to perform gender, and how that relates to processes of exploitation and racialization. We will explore alternatives and develop strategies for navigating jobs in this system. Students may receive credit for one of the following: CGS 120, CGS 180, and ANSC 180.

Ethnic Studies

Course Name h Description

ETHN 1
Introduction to Ethnic Studies: Land and Labor (4)

This course examines key historical events and debates in the field that center around land and labor, including disputes about territory and natural resources, slavery and other forms of unfree labor, labor migration and recruitment, and US and transnational borders. Students may not receive credit for both ETHN 1A and ETHN 1.

ETHN 2
Introduction to Ethnic Studies: Circulations of Difference (4)

Focusing on historical and contemporary migration and the circulation of commodities, knowledge, bodies, and culture, this course looks at how racial formation in the United States and transnationally is shaped and contested by such movements. Students may not receive credit for both ETHN 1B and ETHN 2.

ETHN 3
Introduction to Ethnic Studies: Making Culture (4)

Through examining the historical and contemporary politics of representation in both popular and community-focused media, film, art, music, and literature, this course tracks racial formation through studying the sphere of cultural production, consumption, and contestation. Students may not receive credit for both ETHN 1C and ETHN 3.

ETHN 20
Introduction to Asian American Studies (4)*

This course introduces students to key issues in Asian American lives, with emphasis on the global historical context of migration; changing ethnic and racial consciousness; economic, social, and political status; cultural production; and family and gender relations.

ETHN 103
Environmental Racism (4)

This course will examine the concept of environmental racism, the empirical evidence of its widespread existence, and the efforts by government, residents, workers, and activists to combat it. We will examine those forces that create environmental injustices in order to understand its causes as well as its consequences. Students are expected to learn and apply several concepts and social scientific theories to the course material.

ETHN 104
Race, Space, and Segregation (4)

Through in-depth studies of housing segregation, urban renewal and displacement, neighborhood race effects, and the location of hazards and amenities, this course examines how space becomes racialized and how race becomes spatialized in the contemporary United States.

ETHN 105
Ethnic Diversity and the City (cross-listed with USP 104) (4)

This course will examine the city as a crucible of ethnic identity, exploring both the racial and ethnic dimensions of urban life in the United States from the Civil War to the present.

ETHN 107
Fieldwork in Racial and Ethnic Communities (cross-listed with USP 130) (4)

This is a research course examining social, economic, and political issues in ethnic and racial communities through a variety of research methods that may include interviews and archival, library, and historical research.

ETHN 109
Race and Social Movements (4)

This course explores collective mobilizations for resources, recognition, and power by members of aggrieved racialized groups, past and present. Emphasis will be placed on the conditions that generate collective movements, the strategies and ideologies that these movements have developed, and on the prospect for collective mobilization for change within aggrieved communities in the present and future.

ETHN 118
Contemporary Immigration Issues (4)

This course examines the diversity of today’s immigrants—their social origins and contexts of exit and their adaptation experiences and contexts of incorporation.

ETHN 119
Race in the Americas (4)

This course explores the genesis, evolution, and contradictions of racially heterogeneous societies in the Americas, from European conquest to the present. Topics: the social history of Native Americans, blacks, and Asians, their interactions with European settlers, and racial, sexual, and class divisions.

ETHN 120D
Race and Oral History in San Diego (cross-listed with HIUS 120D) (4 or 6)

This course examines the history of racial and ethnic communities in San Diego. Drawing from historical research and interdisciplinary scholarship, we will explore how race impacted the history and development of San Diego and how “ordinary” folk made sense of their racial identity and experiences. Toward these ends, students will conduct oral history and community-based research, develop public and digital humanities skills, and preserve a collection of oral histories for future scholarship. Concurrent enrollment in an Academic Internship Program course strongly recommended. Students may not receive credit for HIUS 120D and ETHN 120D.

ETHN 121
Contemporary Asian American History (4)

The course will study changes in Asian American communities as a result of renewed immigration since 1965; the influx of refugees from Vietnam, Kampuchea, and Laos; the impact of contemporary social movements on Asian Americans’ current economic, social, and political status.

ETHN 122
Asian American Culture and Identity (4)

A survey of Asian American cultural expressions in literature, art, and music to understand the social experiences that helped forge Asian American identity. Topics: culture conflict, media portrayals, assimilation pressures, the model minority myth, and interethnic and class relations.

ETHN 123
Asian American Politics (4)

This course will examine the development of Asian American politics by studying the historical and contemporary factors, such as political and economic exclusion, that have contributed to the importance and complexity of ethnicity as a mobilizing force in politics.

ETHN 124
Asian American Literature (cross-listed with LTEN 181) (4)

Selected topics in the literature by men and women of Asian descent who live and write in the United States. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ETHN 125
Asian American History (4)

Explore how Asian Americans were involved in the political, economic and cultural formation of United States society. Topics include migration; labor systems; gender, sexuality and social organization; racial ideologies and anti-Asian movements; and nationalism and debates over citizenship.

ETHN 126
Comparative Filipino and Vietnamese American Identities and Communities (4)

This course compares the historical and contemporary social, political, and economic experiences of Filipino and Vietnamese Americans, paying particular attention to the impact of US wars in the Philippines and in Vietnam on their respective lives.

ETHN 129
Asian and Latina Immigrant Workers in the Global Economy (cross-listed with USP 135) (4)

This course will explore the social, political, and economic implications of global economic restructuring, immigration policies, and welfare reform on Asian and Latina immigrant women in the United States. We will critically examine these larger social forces from the perspectives of Latina and Asian immigrant women workers, incorporating theories of race, class, and gender to provide a careful reading of the experiences of immigrant women on the global assembly line.

ETHN 134
Immigration and Ethnicity in Modern American Society (cross-listed with HIUS 180) (4)

Comparative study of immigration and ethnic group formation in the United States from 1880 to the present. Topics include immigrant adaptation, competing theories about the experiences of different ethnic groups, and the persistence of ethnic attachments in modern American society. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

ETHN 140
Comparative Refugee Communities from Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia (4)

This course critically examines the impact of the Vietnam War on refugees from Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Focusing on everyday refugee life, it pays particular attention to how the refugees have created alternative memories, epistemologies, and lifeworlds.

ETHN 152
Law and Civil RIghts (4)

In this course, students explore the relationship between race, class, and law as it applies to civil rights both in a historical and a contemporary context. Topics include racism and the law, history of the Fourteenth Amendment, equal protection, school desegregation, and affirmative action.

ETHN 153
Citizenship and Civil Rights in the Twentieth Century (cross-listed with HIUS 136) (4)

This course traces the history of the institution of United States citizenship in the last century, tracing changing notions of racial, cultural, and gender differences, the evolution of the civil rights struggle, and changes in laws governing citizenship and access to rights.

ETHN 155
US Militarism (4)

This course considers rationales for and responses to American military expansion as well as its social, environmental, and cultural consequences. We will examine racialized, gendered, and sexualized aspects of militarized institutions and practices, including militarized colonialism, tourism, and sex work. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or instructor approval.

ETHN 166
Arab/Muslim American Identity and Culture (cross-listed with LTEN 179) (4)

This class explores (self) representations of Muslim and Arab Americans in US popular culture with a focus on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Topics include the racing of religion, “the war on terror” in the media, feminism and Islam, immigration, race, and citizenship. May be repeated for credit three times when content varies.

ETHN 167
Muslim Identity in America (4)

This course is an introduction to the study of Muslims in the U.S. It examines the ways in which questions of race, gender, and white settler colonial plantation state practices have shaped Muslim lives, both historically and in present times. Topics include the arrival of African Muslims in slave ships, growing Latinx Muslim presence, South Asian and Arab-American Muslims, immigrant-indigenous-black Muslim debates, media representation, resistance movements, and questions of national belonging. May be taken for credit up to two times when content varies.

ETHN 168
Comparative Ethnic Literature (cross-listed with LTEN 178) (4)

A lecture-discussion course that juxtaposes the experience of two or more US ethnic groups and examines their relationship with the dominant culture. Students will analyze a variety of texts representing the history of ethnicity in this country. Topics will vary.

ETHN 183
Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Class (cross-listed with CGS 114) (4)

Gender is often neglected in studies of ethnic/racial politics. This seminar explores the relationship of race, ethnicity, class, and gender by examining the participation of working-class women of color in community politics and how they challenge mainstream political theory.

History

Course Name h Description

HILD 7B
Race and Ethnicity in the US (4)*

A lecture-discussion course on the comparative ethnic history of the United States. Of central concern will be the Asian American and white ethnic groups, race, oppression, mass migrations, ethnicity, city life in industrial America, and power and protest in modern America.

HIEA 114
Postwar Japan (4)

Examines social, cultural, political, and economic transformations and continuities in Japan since World War II. Emphases will differ by instructor.

HIEA 125
Women and Gender in East Asia (4)

The impact of modern transformations on female roles and gender relations in China, Japan, and Korea, focusing on the late imperial/early modern periods through the twentieth century.

HIEA 137
Women and the Family in Chinese History (4)

The course explores the institutions of family and marriage, and women’s roles and experiences within the family and beyond, from classical times to the early twentieth century.

HIEA 139GS
An Introduction to Southeast Asia (circ 800-1900) (4)

This course provides an overview of Southeast Asian culture and history from 800 to the age of imperialism. It addresses regional geography, diversity, religion, political and social structures, mercantile and cultural ties abroad, the arrival of Islam, and the region’s changing relationship with European and Asian power. Students must apply and be accepted into the Global Seminars Program.

HIEA 144
Topics in East Asian History (4)

Selected topics in East Asian History. Course may be taken for credit up to three times as topics vary.

HIEA 151
The Two Koreas, 1945-Present (4)

This course traces the peninsula’s division into two rival regimes. It utilizes both textual and audio-visual materials to reveal the varied experiences of North and South Koreans with authoritarianism, industrialization, and globalization. HILD 10, 11, and/or 12 recommended.

HIEA 152
History and Cultures of the Korean Diaspora (4)

This course places the Korean diaspora in national, regional, and global frames from the imperial age to our globalized present. It traces migrant experiences and community formations on the peninsula and in Japan, the United States, China, and the former USSR.

HIEA 153
Social and Cultural History of Twentieth-Century Korea (4)

This course explores the cultural and social structures that dominated twentieth-century Korea: imperialism, ethnonationalism, heteropatriarchy, capitalism, socialism, and militarism. It also uses individual and collective engagements with these hegemonic structures to demonstrate contentious interactions between individuals and society.

HIEA 180
Topics in Modern Korean History (4)

This colloquium will examine selected topics in modern Korean history through both primary sources (in translation) and secondary sources. Topics will vary year to year. Prerequisites: upper-division standing and department stamp.

HISC 109
Invention of Tropical Disease (4)

Explores the origins of the idea of the “tropics” and “tropical disease” as a legacy of European conquest and colonization and introduces students to themes in the history of colonialism, tropical medicine, and global public health.

HITO 114
History of Modern Vietnam (4)

This course introduces students to the history of modern Vietnam, starting with the Tay Son rebellion in the late eighteenth century and ending with the economic reforms of the 1980s. Topics include the expansion and consolidation of the French colonial state, the rise of anticolonialism and nationalism, the development of Vietnamese communism, World War II, and the First and Second Indochina Wars. A special emphasis will be focused on the place of Vietnam within wider regional and global histories.

HITO 115/115GS
The Global Cold War (4)

The Cold War is often understood as a superpower rivalry between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. Yet, the second half of the twentieth century witnessed civil wars, revolutions, decolonization movements, and state violence throughout the world that do not fit in this bipolar framework. Focusing on these other events, this course reexamines the Cold War in global and comparative perspective, with a particular focus on political developments in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

HITO 133D
War and Society: The Second World War (4)

An examination of the Second World War in Europe, Asia, and the United States. Focus will be on the domestic impact of the war on the belligerent countries as well as on the experiences of ordinary soldiers and civilians.

HITO 160GS
Globalization and Diaspora (4)

A course on Hong Kong’s political, economic, and cultural transformation alongside its incorporation into the global capitalist economy, with a focus on transnational migrants laboring and living in diaspora. Topics include Opium Wars, world system, export-processing zones, and anti-globalization movements. Students must submit applications to the International Center, Programs Abroad Office, and be accepted into the Global Seminar Program. Program or materials fees may apply.

HIUS 103
United States and the Pacific World (4)

History of the United States in the Pacific, with an emphasis on Hawai’i, Guam, the Mariana Islands, and the Marshall Islands, from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include colonialism and imperialism, cultural representations, indigenous knowledge and sovereignty, militarism, tourism, and environmentalism. Students will not receive credit for both HIUS 103 and ETHN 103A.

HIUS 106B
American Foreign Relations, since 1900 (4)

Examines foreign relations of the United States from acquisition of a formal overseas empire in the aftermath of the Spanish-American War to the end of the Cold War. Topics cover a range of public and private interactions with the world.

HIUS 117
History of Los Angeles (4)

This course examines the history of Los Angeles from the early nineteenth century to the present. Particular issues to be addressed include urbanization, ethnicity, politics, technological change, and cultural diversification.

HIUS 120D
Race and Oral History in San Diego (cross-listed with ETHN 120D) (4 or 6)

This course examines the history of racial and ethnic communities in San Diego. Drawing from historical research and interdisciplinary scholarship, we will explore how race impacted the history and development of San Diego and how “ordinary” folk made sense of their racial identity and experiences. Toward these ends, students will conduct oral history and community-based research, develop public and digital humanities skills, and preserve a collection of oral histories for future scholarship. Concurrent enrollment in an Academic Internship Program course strongly recommended. Students may not receive credit for HIUS 120D and ETHN 120D.

HIUS 125
Asian American Social Movements (4)

History of Asian American activism from the late-nineteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on interethnic, interracial, and transnational solidarity practices. Topics include struggles for civil rights and labor rights; immigration reform; antiwar and anticolonial movements; hate crimes; and police brutality. Students may receive credit for one of the following: HIUS 125, HIUS 125GS, or ETHN 163J.

HIUS 126
The History of Race in the United States (4)

Examines key periods, events, and processes throughout the twentieth century that shaped the way Americans thought about race. Also examines the historical development of the category of race and racism, as well as how it is lived in everyday life.

HIUS 129
The History of Race and Ethnicity in American Cities (cross-listed with USP 106) (4)

This class examines the history of racial and ethnic groups in American cities. It looks at major forces of change such as immigration to cities, political empowerment, and social movements, as well as urban policies such as housing segregation.

HIUS 136
Citizenship and Civil Rights in the Twentieth Century (cross-listed with ETHN 153) (4)

This course traces the history of the institution of US citizenship in the last century, tracing changing notions of racial, cultural, and gender differences, the evolution of the civil rights struggle, and changes in laws governing citizenship and access to rights.

HIUS 146
Race, Riots, and Violence in the US (4)

Examining the history of urban riots in the United States since the late nineteenth century. Exploring how different groups of Americans have constructed competing notions of race, gender, labor, and national belonging by participating in street violence.

HIUS 155
From Zoot Suits to Hip-Hop: Race and Popular Culture since World War II (4)

Tracing popular cultural production and consumption in the United States since World War II. It historicizes popular culture as an arena where social relations are negotiated and where race, class, and gender identities are constructed, transformed, and contested.

HIUS 168
Race, Resistance, and Cultural Politics (4)

The course investigates race, resistance, and culture in the United States since the late nineteenth century. It interrogates how working-class whites, African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and others have simultaneously challenged, shaped, and assimilated into US society. May be coscheduled with HIUS 268. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HIUS 162/262
The American West (4)

This seminar will trace major themes in the history of the American West. Topics will include ethnicity, the environment, urbanization, demographics, and shifting concepts surrounding the significance of the West. Graduate students will be required to submit additional work in order to receive graduate credit for the course. Prerequisites: department stamp required.

HIUS 174
Race Wars in American Culture (4)

This seminar examines race and war in US history, with an emphasis on their intersections and co-constitutions. Topics include frontier wars and “manifest destiny;” border enforcement, antiradicalism, the war on drugs, and mass incarceration; and the war on terror. Prerequisites: department approval required.

HIUS 176/276
Race and Sexual Politics (4)

This seminar will explore the histories of sexual relations, politics, and cultures that both cross and define racial boundaries in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Reading will focus on the United States as well as take up studies sited in Canada and Latin America. Graduate students are expected to submit a more substantial piece of work. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HIUS 180
Immigration and Ethnicity in Modern American Society (cross-listed with ETHN 134) (4)

Comparative study of immigration and ethnic-group formation in the United States from 1880 to the present. Topics include immigrant adaptation, competing theories about the experiences of different ethnic groups, and the persistence of ethnic attachments in modern American society. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

Japanese Studies

Course Name h Description

JAPN 10A/B/C
First-Year Japanese (5)

JAPN 10A: This course is an introduction to the Japanese language. Students will learn basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing over seventy-five characters. Students will also acquire fundamental knowledge of Japanese grammar and learn about Japanese people and culture.


JAPN 10B: This course is an introduction to the Japanese language. Students will learn basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing over seventy-two additional characters. Students will also acquire fundamental knowledge of Japanese grammar and learn about Japanese people and culture. Prerequisites: previous course or consent of instructor.


JAPN 10C: This course is an introduction to the Japanese language. Students will learn basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing over forty-eight additional characters. Students will also acquire fundamental knowledge of Japanese grammar and learn about Japanese people and culture. Prerequisites: previous course or consent of instructor.

JAPN 20A/B/C
Second-Year Japanese (5)

JAPN 20A: Students will improve their fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing including acquiring knowledge of Japanese transportation, trips, and geography. Prerequisites: previous course or consent of instructor.


JAPN 20B: Students will improve their fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing including acquiring knowledge of life experiences, Japanese culture, customs, health, and school. Prerequisites: previous course or consent of instructor.


JAPN 20C: Students will improve their fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing including acquiring knowledge of Japanese culture and customs. Students will conduct research including writing a short essay and presentation. Prerequisites: previous course or consent of instructor.

JAPN 130A/B/C
Third-Year Japanese (5)

JAPN 130A: This course will require students to gain knowledge, comprehend, evaluate, and discuss Japanese customs. Students will critically analyze and compare culture and customs of Japan and other countries. Course work includes student research on issues in Japanese society. Prerequisites: previous course or consent of instructor.


JAPN 130B: This course will require students to gain knowledge, comprehend, evaluate, and discuss topics of education system and youth issues in Japan and other countries. Students will learn vocabulary and phrases to support, explain, research, and hypothesize concrete and abstract topics. Prerequisites: previous course or consent of instructor.


JAPN 130C: This course will require students to gain knowledge, comprehend, evaluate, and discuss the environment and internationalization issues. Students will learn vocabulary and phrases to critically analyze and compare, express their opinions, and present and propose possible solutions for these topics. Prerequisites: previous course or consent of instructor.

JAPN 135A/B/C
Japanese for Professional Purposes (4)

JAPN 135A: Training in oral and written communication skills for professional settings in Japanese. Broad aspects of cultural issues in Japanese organizations are introduced and comparison of American and Japanese cultural business patterns will be conducted. Prerequisites: JAPN 20C, or consent of instructor.


JAPN 135B: Continuation of training in oral and written communication skills for professional settings in Japanese. Broad aspects of cultural issues in Japanese organizations are introduced and comparison of American and Japanese cultural business patterns will be conducted. Prerequisites: JAPN 135A, or consent of instructor.


JAPN 135C: Continuation of training in oral and written communication skills for professional settings in Japanese. Broad aspects of cultural issues in Japanese organizations are introduced and comparison of American and Japanese cultural business patterns will be conducted. Prerequisites: JAPN 135B.

JAPN 140A/B/C
Fourth-Year Japanese (4)

Prerequisites: previous course or consent of instructor.

JAPN 150A/B/C
Advanced Japanese (4)

Prerequisites: previous course or consent of instructor.

Linguistics

Course Name h Description

LIHL 112F/W/P
Linguistics/Filipino for Filipino Speakers (4)

LIHL 112F: For students who comprehend informal spoken Filipino but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and family life/festivals; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Filipino. May not receive credit for both LIHL112 and LIHL112F. Courses may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 112W: For students who comprehend informal spoken Filipino but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and media/arts; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Filipino. May not receive credit for both LIHL112 and LIHL112W. Courses may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 112P: For students who comprehend informal spoken Filipino but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and entertainment/culture; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Filipino. May not receive credit for both LIHL112 and LIHL112P. Courses may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.

LIHL 132F/W/P
Linguistics/Advanced Filipino for Filipino Speakers (4)

LIHL 132F: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on domestic culture. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Filipino. LIHL 132F, LIHL 132W, and LIHL 132P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 132W: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on media/arts. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Filipino. LIHL 132F, LIHL 132W, and LIHL 132P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 132P: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on entertainment/culture. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Filipino. LIHL 132F, LIHL 132W, and LIHL 132P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.

LIHL 114F/W/P
Linguistics/Vietnamese for Vietnamese Speakers (4)

LIHL 114F: For students who comprehend informal spoken Vietnamese but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and family life/festivals; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Vietnamese. LIHL 114F, LIHL 114W, and LIHL 114P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 114W: For students who comprehend informal spoken Vietnamese but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and media/arts; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Vietnamese. LIHL 114F, LIHL 114W, and LIHL 114P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 114P: For students who comprehend informal spoken Vietnamese but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and entertainment/culture; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Vietnamese. LIHL 114F, LIHL 114W, and LIHL 114P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.

LIHL 124F/W/P
Linguistics/Intermediate Vietnamese for Vietnamese Speakers (4)

LIHL 124F: Linguistics/Advanced Vietnamese for Vietnamese Speakers. This course is designed to improve oral and written skills in the context of Vietnamese domestic culture. For students with basic proficiency in spoken and written Vietnamese, but who require improvement in basic grammar, word choice, punctuation, and spelling. LIHL124F, LIHL124W, and LIHL124P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 124W: Linguistics/Advanced Vietnamese for Vietnamese Speakers. This course is designed to improve oral and written skills in the context of Vietnamese media/arts. For students with basic proficiency in spoken and written Vietnamese, but who require improvement in basic grammar, word choice, punctuation, and spelling. LIHL124F, LIHL124W, and LIHL124P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 124P: Linguistics/Advanced Vietnamese for Vietnamese Speakers. This course is designed to improve oral and written skills in the context of Vietnamese entertainment/culture. For students with basic proficiency in spoken and written Vietnamese, but who require improvement in basic grammar, word choice, punctuation, and spelling. LIHL124F, LIHL124W, and LIHL124P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.

LIHL 134F/W/P
Linguistics/Advanced Vietnamese for Vietnamese Speakers (4)

LIHL 134F: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on domestic culture. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Vietnamese. LIHL 134F, LIHL 134W, and LIHL 134P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 134W: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on media/arts. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Vietnamese. LIHL 134F, LIHL 134W, and LIHL 134P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 134P: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on entertainment/culture. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Vietnamese. LIHL 134F, LIHL 134W, and LIHL 134P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.

LIHL 115F/W/P
Linguistics/Korean for Korean Speakers (4)

LIHL 115F: For students who comprehend informal spoken Korean but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and family life/festivals; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Korean. LIHL 115F, LIHL 115W, and LIHL 115P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 115W: For students who comprehend informal spoken Korean but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and media/arts; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Korean. LIHL 115F, LIHL 115W, and LIHL 115P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 115P: For students who comprehend informal spoken Korean but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and entertainment/culture; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Korean. LIHL 115F, LIHL 115W, and LIHL 115P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.

LIHL 135F/W/P
Linguistics/Advanced Korean for Korean Speakers (4)

LIHL 135F: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on domestic culture. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Korean LIHL 135F, LIHL 135W, and LIHL 135P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level. (Not offered in 2018–19.)


LIHL 135W: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on media/arts. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Korean. LIHL 135F, LIHL 135W, and LIHL 135P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level. (Not offered in 2018–19.)


LIHL 135P: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on entertainment/culture. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Korean. LIHL 135F, LIHL 135W, and LIHL 135P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level. (Not offered in 2018–19.)

LIHL 119F/W/P
Linguistics/Hindi for Hindi Speakers (4)

LIHL 119F: For students who comprehend informal spoken Hindi but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and family life/festivals; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Hindi. LIHL 119F, LIHL 119W, and LIHL 119P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 119W: For students who comprehend informal spoken Hindi but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and family media/arts; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Hindi. LIHL 119F, LIHL 119W, and LIHL 119P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.


LIHL 119P: For students who comprehend informal spoken Hindi but wish to improve their communicative and sociocultural competence and their analytic understanding. Language functions for oral communication, reading, writing, and entertainment/culture; dialect and language style differences; structure and history of Hindi. LIHL 119F, LIHL 119W, and LIHL 119P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level.

LIHIL 139F/W/P
Linguistics/Advanced Hindi for Hindi Speakers (4)

LIHL 139F: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on domestic culture. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Hindi. LIHL 139F, LIHL 139W, and LIHL 139P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level. (Not offered in 2018–19.)


LIHL 139W: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on media/arts. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Hindi. LIHL 139F, LIHL 139W, and LIHL 139P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level. (Not offered in 2018–19.)


LIHL 139P: Instruction stresses language function required for advanced oral communication, reading, writing, and cultural understanding in professional contexts, with emphasis on entertainment/culture. High-level vocabulary and texts; dialect differences and formal language styles (registers). Advanced structural analysis and history of Hindi. LIHL 139F, LIHL 139W, and LIHL 139P may be taken in any order. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; appropriate proficiency for level. (Not offered in 2018–19.)

Literature

Course Name h Description

LTCS 119
Asian American Film, Video, and New Media (cross-listed with CGS 119) (4)

The course explores the politics of pleasure in relation to the production, reception, and performance of Asian American identities in the mass media of film, video, and the internet. The course considers how the “deviant” sexuality of Asian Americans (e.g., hypersexual women and emasculated men) does more than uniformly harm and subjugate Asian American subjects. The texts explored alternate between those produced by majoritarian culture and the interventions made by Asian American filmmakers. Students may not receive credit for LTCS 119 and CGS 119.

LTEA 132
Later Japanese Literature in Translation (4)

An introduction to later Japanese (kogo) literature in translation. Will focus on several “modern” works, placing their forms in the historical context. No knowledge of Japanese is required. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTEA 138
Japanese Films (4)

An introduction to Japanese films. Attention given to representative Japanese directors (e.g., Ozu), form (e.g., anime), genre (e.g., feminist revenge horror), or historical context in which films are produced. Priority may be given to Japanese studies majors and literature majors.

LTEA 152A
Topics in Filipino Literature and Culture (Nineteenth Century - World War II) (4)

Surveys the authors, intellectual currents, and cultural politics of Filipino culture from the 1850s to World War II. Topics may include the legacy of Spanish colonialism, European enlightenment, and the emergence of nationalism and socialism, and Filipino literature in English. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEA 152B
Topics in Filipino Literature and Culture (World War II - Present) (4)

Surveys the authors, intellectual currents, and cultural politics of Filipino culture from World War II to the present. Topics may include the dual lingua franca, the birth of “Filipino American” literature, the culture of dictatorship, and new approaches to narrative. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEN 28
Introduction to Asian American Literature (4)*

This course provides an introduction to the study of the history, communities, and cultures of different Asian American people in the United States. Students will examine different articulations, genres, conflicts, narrative forms, and characterizations of the varied Asian experience.

LTEN 178
Comparative Ethnic Literature (cross-listed with ETHN 168) (4)

A lecture-discussion course that juxtaposes the experience of two or more US ethnic groups and examines their relationship with the dominant culture. Students will analyze a variety of texts representing the history of ethnicity in this country. Topics will vary.

LTEN 179
Topics: Arab/Muslim American Identity and Culture (cross-listed with ETHN 166) (4)

This class explores (self) representations of Muslim and Arab Americans in US popular culture wih a focus on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Topics include the racing of religion, “the war on terror” in the media, feminism and Islam, immigration, race, and citizenship. May be repeated for credit three times when content varies.

LTEN 181
Asian American Literature (4)

Selected topics in the literature by men and women of Asian descent who live and write in the United States. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 189
Twentieth-Century Postcolonial Literatures (4)

The impact of British colonialism, national independence movements, postcolonial cultural trends, and women’s movements on the global production of literary texts in English. Course is organized by topic or geographical/historical location. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Political Science

Course Name h Description

POLI 100H
Race and Ethnicity in American Politics (4)

This course examines the processes by which racial and ethnic groups have/have not been incorporated into the American political system. The course focuses on the political experiences of European immigrant groups, blacks, Latinos, and Asians.

POLI 100Y
Asian American Politics in the United States (4)

This class is a survey of historical and contemporary issues in Asian American politics in the U.S.; race and ethnicity in the context of US politics; comparisons of racial and ethnic group experiences in the U.S. with those experienced by racial and ethnic groups elsewhere; Asian American access to the political system through political participation. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

Sociology

Course Name h Description

SOCI 117
Language, Culture, and Education (4)

The mutual influence of language, culture, and education will be explored; explanations of students’ school successes and failures that employ linguistic and cultural variables will be considered; bilingualism; cultural transmission through education. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 117 and SOCB 117.

SOCI 125
Sociology of Immigration (4)

Immigration from a comparative, historical, and cultural perspective. Topics include factors influencing amount of immigration and destination of immigrants; varying modes of incorporation of immigrants; immigration policies and rights; the impact of immigration on host economies; refugees; assimilation; and return migration. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 125 and SOCB 125.

SOCI 127
Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity (4)

Examination of the role that race and ethnicity play in immigrant group integration. Topics include theories of integration, racial and ethnic identity formation, racial and ethnic change, immigration policy, public opinion, comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 127 and SOCB 127.

SOCI 133
Immigration in Comparative Perspective (4)

Societies across the world are confronting new immigration. In this course, we will focus on Europe, Asia, and North America, and examine issues of nationalism, cultural diversity and integration, economic impacts, and government policy. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 133 and SOCB 133.

SOCI 139
Social Inequality: Class, Race, and Gender (4)

Massive inequality in wealth, power, and prestige is ever-present in industrial societies. In this course, causes and consequences of class, gender, racial, and ethnic inequality (“stratification”) will be considered through examination of classical and modern social science theory and research. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 139 and SOCC 139.

SOCI 163
Migration and the Law (4)

Provides a global sociological perspective on the development and consequences of laws regulating migration within and across nation-state borders. The ability of the nation-state to control migration using law and its policy instruments. The effects of different legal statuses on political and socioeconomic outcomes. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 163 and SOCC 163.

Theatre and Dance

Course Name h Description

TDHT 103
Asian American Theatre (4)

This course examines pivotal dramatic works in the history of professional Asian American theatre in the United States (1960s to the present). Issues include interculturalism, the crossover between minority theatres and mainstream venues, and the performance of identity. TDHT 103 is an approved Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) course. No prior knowledge in theatre history is needed. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Urban Studies and Planning

Course Name h Description

USP 104
Ethnic Diversity and the City (cross-listed with ETHN 105) (4)

This course will examine the city as a crucible of ethnic identity exploring both the racial and ethnic dimensions of urban life in the United States from the Civil War to the present. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

USP 106
The History of Race and Ethnicity in American Cities (cross-listed with HIUS 129) (4)

This class examines the history of racial and ethnic groups in American cities. It looks at major forces of change such as immigration to cities, political empowerment, and social movements, as well as urban policies such as housing segregation. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

USP 130
Fieldwork in Racial and Ethnic Communities (cross-listed with ETHN 107) (4)

This is a research course examining social, economic, and political issues in ethnic and racial communities through fieldwork. Topics are examined through a variety of research methods which may include interviews and archival, library, and historical research. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

USP 135
Asian and Latina Immigrant Workers in the Global Economy (cross-listed with ETHN 129) (4)

This course will explore the social, political, and economic implications of global economic restructuring, immigration policies, and welfare reform on Asian and Latina immigrant women in the United States. We will critically examine these larger social forces from the perspectives of Latina and Asian immigrant women workers, incorporating theories of race, class, and gender to provide a careful reading of the experiences of immigrant women on the global assembly line. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

Visual Arts

Course Name h Description

VIS 21A
Introduction to the Art of the Americas or Africa and Oceania (4)

Course offers a comparative and thematic approach to the artistic achievements of societies with widely divergent structures and political organizations from the ancient Americas to Africa and the Pacific Islands. Topics vary with the interests and expertise of instructor. Students may not receive credit for VIS 21 and VIS 21A.

VIS 126K
Oceanic Art (4)

An examination of the relation of art to ritual life, mythology, and social organization in the native Polynesian and Melanesian cultures of Hawaii, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and Australia. Recommended preparation: VIS 21A. Students may not receive credit for both VIS 126E and VIS 126K. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.